Tokyo Agreement Aviation

Offences committed on board a Belgian aircraft are considered to have been committed in Belgium and are therefore subject to the Belgian Criminal Code. However, if a Belgian Alrcraft was flying over Switzerland at the time of committing a criminal offence, it may also be subject to Swiss criminal law, which may provide for very different penalties. On 27 November 1961, the ICAO Council invited the Chairman of the Legal Committee to appoint a subcommittee on the legal status of aircraft to examine the opinions of States and international organizations on the 1959 Munich project. [21] The Committee on Legal Affairs acted accordingly with the subcommittee that met in Montreal from March 26 to April 5, 1962. The subcommittee made some changes and proposed, in addition to new alternative provisions. The study of the question of the legal status of the aircraft had already been the subject of debate since the pioneering work of the French jurist Paul Fauchille in 1902 and was often visited by early organizations such as the International Technical Committee of Air Legal Experts[3]. the Institute of International Law(Institute of International Law), the International Criminal Police Commission and the International Law Association. [4] The issue remained one of the main legal issues until the thirteen years of pre-legislative efforts of the International Civil Aviation Organization culminated in the Convention on Criminal Offences and Certain Other Acts Committed on Board Aircraft on December 4, 1969. . .